Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 2

June 28, 2010

dog training, PhD, Robert Forto

Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 2

This is continuing series on the most influential people in dog training and how they effect how we train dogs today.

Most and Koehler

Colonel Conrad Most wrote Training Dogs in 1910.  This work is thought by many to be one of, if not the first, dog training “how to” manual.  Colonel Most began training police dogs in 1906 in Germany.  Soon thereafter he began to explain canine learning tendencies from a handler’s perspective.  In his manual Training Dogs the Colonel exhibited an extraordinary understanding of the principles of operant conditioning, this was nearly thirty-years prior to the publication of B. F. Skinner’s The Behavior of Organisms.  In the 1940’s Colonel Most was sharing his knowledge with the trainers at the German Dog Farm, a center that trained dogs for the blind.  Many of his methods would be considered “heavy-handed” by today’s standards; nevertheless, it would be remiss not to acknowledge the Colonel’s contribution to the training procedures used by previous guide dog trainers, many of which are still used today.

William Koehler (1934-1998) began his career by training dogs for the military.  After World War II, Koehler became the lead trainer of the Orange Empire Dog Club, which was well known, and envied for the large number of obedience titles that it’s members earned.

William Koehler, along with his son Dick, purportedly had trained in excess of forty thousand canines at their own training facility.  Just as with Colonel Conrad Most, Koehler’s training method would be considered “heavy-handed” by many and downright inhumane by some.  He based his procedure largely on a combination of negative reinforcement and punishment.   Negative reinforcement is built upon the premise of the canine complying in order to remove or avoid an unpleasant stimulus.  Punishment, on the other hand, is described as a consequence that will make a behavior less likely to reoccur in the future.  Just as with positive reinforcement procedures, the principles are built on the foundation laid by Thorndike’s Law of Effect.

Mary R. Burch, Ph.D., and Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D. met and observed Bill Koehler in the course of their research.  They stated that Koehler “…appeared then to be a kind and gentle man, and he clearly loved dogs.”

Many have described Koehler’s methods as “heavy-handed”, but in all fairness, he was one of the few trainers in the country in the 1980’s that was known for his ability to rehabilitate tough dogs, and was often the canine’s last hope.  Again, whether one agrees with his methods or not, Koehler’s impact on dog training procedures can not be understated. Nor can his contribution to the effectiveness of negative reinforcement be understated.  While dog training has indeed moved toward a friendlier, more positive approach, perhaps several of Most’s and Koehler’s methods are used today in a majority of police, military, and advanced assistance dog training facilities.

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Dr. Robert Forto, PhD is the training director for Denver Dog Works and the host of the popular Dog Doctor Radio Show.

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About robertforto

Robert Forto is the owner of Dog Works Training Company in Alaska, a canine behaviorist, mushin' down a dream, sports nut and radio show host. Robert writes a lot about his observations in Alaska, pop culture, music, and of course dogs!

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One Comment on “Influential Dog Trainers and their Contributions Part 2”

  1. Ron Watson Says:

    Great catch, Doc!

    Most’s book, Training Dogs: A Manual, was an excellent read, and I say that as a positive dog trainer.

    I found his primary and secondary inducers (iirc the terminology) to be absolutely fascinating. As I was reading it, I thought that Skinner must have robbed him.

    I have to admit to closing the book about 1/2 way through as the theoretical became the practical, as I got a bit squeamish.

    Here’s my favorite quote (hopefully I don’t butcher it too bad):
    “Dogs only know agreeable and disagreeable and it is not desireable for them to know anything more.”

    This really hit home for me as we really teach our dogs FAR more than agreeable and disagreeable and it’s sometimes troublesome.

    Peace,
    Ron

    Reply

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